About Tshirt

Boracay Tours Philippines - Boracay Travel Agent Website & Tours Guide - Main White Beach, Island Paradise
NEED a travel website like ToursBoracay.com ? WE create travel websites for travel agents, travel agencies and tour operators.

White Sand Beach, Boracay Beachfront Resort Hotels, Beach Resorts Reservation
Caticlan, Kalibo, Aklan, Panay Island Travel
Tours Boracay, About Tours Boracay, Boracay Map, Contact Tours Boracay, Boracay Beach Hotels, Users Review


About Tshirt

T-shirt – also "tee shirt", a casual shirt without a collar or buttons, made of a stretchy, finely knit fabric, usually cotton, and usually short-sleeved. Originally worn under other shirts, it is now a common shirt for everyday wear in some countries.

  • Long-sleeved T-shirt – a t-shirt with long sleeves that extend to cover the arms.
    Ringer T-shirt – tee with a separate piece of fabric sewn on as the collar and sleeve hems

  • Halfshirt – a high-hemmed T-shirt
    Sleeveless shirt – a shirt manufactured without sleeves, or one whose sleeves have been cut off

  • A-shirt or vest or singlet (in British English) – essentially a sleeveless shirt with large armholes and a large neck hole, often worn by labourers or athletes for increased movability. Sometimes called a "wife beater" when worn without a covering layer.

  • Camisole – woman's undershirt with narrow straps, or a similar garment worn alone (often with bra). Also referred to as a cami, shelf top, spaghetti straps or strappy top

A T-shirt (or T shirt, tee-shirt, or tee) is a style of soft shirt, named after the T shape of the body and sleeves. It is normally associated with short sleeves, a round neck line known as a "crew neck", and no collar.

Typically made of cotton fibers knitted in a jersey stitch, they have a distinctive soft texture compared to woven shirts. The majority of modern versions have a body made from a continuously woven tube, on a circular loom, so that the torso has no side seams. The manufacture of T-shirts has become highly automated, and may include fabric cutting by laser or water jet.

The T-shirt evolved from undergarments used in the 19th century, through cutting the one-piece "union suit" underwear into separate top and bottom garments, with the top long enough to tuck under the waistband of the bottoms. With and without buttons, they were adopted by miners and stevedores during the late 19th century as a convenient covering for hot environments.

As slip-on garments without buttons, they originally became popular in the United States when they were issued by the U.S. Navy during or following the Spanish–American War of 1898. These were a crew-necked, short-sleeved, white cotton undershirt to be worn under a uniform. It became common for sailors and Marines in work parties, the early submarines, and tropical climates to remove their uniform "jacket", wearing (and soiling) only the undershirt.

They soon became popular as a bottom layer of clothing for workers in various industries, including agriculture. The T-shirt was easily fitted, easily cleaned, and inexpensive, and for those reasons it became the shirt of choice for young boys. Boys' shirts were made in various colors and patterns. By the Great Depression, the T-shirt was often the default garment to be worn when doing farm or ranch chores, as well as other times when modesty called for a torso covering but conditions called for lightweight fabrics.

A V-neck T-shirt has a V-shaped neckline, as opposed to the round neckline of the more common crew neck shirt. V-necks were introduced so that the neckline of the shirt does not stand out when an outer shirt is worn over it, thus reducing or eliminating the visible cloth above the outer shirt of a crew neck shirt.

Tshirt History

T-shirts, made of a light, inexpensive fabric, were easy to clean. The earliest T-shirt dates back to sometime between the Spanish–American War and 1913, when the U.S. Navy began issuing them as undergarments. The word "T-shirt" became part of American English by the 1920s, and appeared in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Following World War II, it became common to see veterans wearing their uniform trousers with their T-shirts as casual clothing. They became even more popular in the 1950s after Marlon Brando wore one in A Streetcar Named Desire, finally achieving status as fashionable, stand-alone, outer-wear garments. Often boys wore them while doing chores and playing outside, eventually opening up the idea of wearing them as general-purpose casual clothing.

Printed T-shirts were in limited use by 1942 when an Air Corps Gunnery School T-shirt appeared on the cover of Life magazine. In the 1960s, printed T-shirts gained popularity for self-expression as well for advertisements, protests, and souvenirs.

Current versions are available in many different designs and fabrics, and styles include crew-neck and V-neck shirts.

Tshirt Trends

T-shirts were originally worn as undershirts, but are now worn frequently as the only piece of clothing on the top half of the body, other than possibly a brassiere or an undershirt (vest). T-shirts have also become a medium for self-expression and advertising, with any imaginable combination of words, art and photographs on display.

A T-shirt typically extends to the waist. Variants of the T-shirt, such as the V-neck, have been developed. Hip hop fashion calls for "tall-T" shirts which may extend down to the knees. A 1990s trend in women's clothing involved tight-fitting "cropped" T-shirt or crop tops short enough to reveal the midriff. Another less popular trend is wearing a short-sleeved T-shirt of a contrasting color over a long-sleeved T-shirt, which is known as "layering". T-shirts that are tight to the body are called fitted, tailored or "baby doll" T-shirts.

Parts of shirt

Many terms are used to describe and differentiate types of shirts (and upper-body garments in general) and their construction. The smallest differences may have significance to a cultural or occupational group. Recently, (late twentieth century) it has become common to use tops to carry messages or advertising. Many of these distinctions apply to other upper-body garments, such as coats and sweaters.
Shoulders and arms

Sleeves Shirts may:

  • have no covering of the shoulders or arms — a tube top (not reaching higher than the armpits, staying in place by elasticity)

  • have only shoulder straps, such as spaghetti straps

  • cover the shoulders, but without sleeves

  • have shoulderless sleeves, short or long, with or without shoulder straps, that expose the shoulders, but cover the rest of the arm from the biceps and triceps down to at least the elbow

  • have short sleeves, varying from cap sleeves (covering only the shoulder and not extending below the armpit) to half sleeves (elbow length), with some having quarter-length sleeves (reaching to a point that covers half of the biceps and triceps area)

  • have three-quarter-length sleeves (reaching to a point between the elbow and the wrist)
    have long sleeves (reaching a point to the wrist to a little beyond wrist)

Cuffs Shirts with long sleeves may further be distinguished by the cuffs:

  • no buttons — a closed placket cuff

  • buttons (or analogous fasteners such as snaps) — single or multiple. A single button or pair aligned parallel with the cuff hem is considered a button cuff. Multiple buttons aligned perpendicular to the cuff hem, or parallel to the placket constitute a barrel cuff.

  • button holes designed for cufflinks
    a French cuff, where the end half of the cuff is folded over the cuff itself and fastened with a cufflink. This type of cuff has four buttons and a short placket.

  • more formally, a link cuff — fastened like a French cuff, except is not folded over, but instead hemmed, at the edge of the sleeve.

  • asymmetrical designs, such as one-shoulder, one-sleeve or with sleeves of different lengths.

Lower hem leaving the belly button area bare (much more common for women than for men).

  • hanging to the waist

  • covering the crotch

  • covering part of the legs (essentially this is a dress; however, a piece of clothing is perceived either as a shirt (worn with trousers) or as a dress (in Western culture mainly worn by women)).

  • going to the floor (as a pajama shirt)

Body

  • vertical opening on the front side, all the way down, with buttons or zipper.

  • When fastened with buttons, this opening is often called the placket front similar opening, but in back.

  • left and right front side not separable, put on over the head; with regard to upper front side opening:

  • V-shaped permanent opening on the top of the front side

  • no opening at the upper front side

  • vertical opening on the upper front side with buttons or zipper

  • men's shirts are often buttoned on the right whereas women's are often buttoned on the left.

Neck

  • with polo-neck

  • with v-neck but no collar

  • with plunging neck

  • with open or tassel neck

  • with collar

  • windsor collar or spread collar — a dressier collar designed with a wide distance between points (the spread) to accommodate the windsor knot tie. The standard business collar.

  • tab collar – a collar with two small fabric tabs that fasten together behind a tie to maintain collar spread.

  • wing collar – best suited for the bow tie, often only worn for very formal occasions.

  • straight collar – or point collar, a version of the windsor collar that is distinguished by a narrower spread to better accommodate the four-in-hand knot, pratt knot, and the half-windsor knot. A moderate dress collar.

  • button-down collar – A collar with buttons that fasten the points or tips to a shirt. The most casual of collars worn with a tie.

  • band collar ~ essentially the lower part of a normal collar, first used as the original collar to which a separate collarpiece was attached. Rarely seen in modern fashion. Also casual.

  • turtle neck collar – A collar that covers most of the throat.
    without collar

  • V-neck no collar;– The neckline protrudes down the chest and to a point, creating a "V" looking neck line.

Other features

  • pockets – how many (if any), where, and with regard to closure: not closable, just a flap, or with a button or zipper.
    with or without hood

Some combinations are not applicable, e.g. a tube top cannot have a collar.

Know more about Tshirt at Chris Weidman Walkout Shirt

About Tshirt

Types of fabric tshirt

There are two main categories of fibres used: natural fibre and man-made fibre (synthetics or petroleum based). Some natural fibres are linen, the first used historically, cotton, the most used, ramie, wool, silk and more recently bamboo or soya. Some synthetic fibres are polyester, tencel, viscose, etc. Polyester mixed with cotton (poly-cotton) is often used. Fabrics for shirts are called shirtings. The four main weaves for shirtings are plain weave, oxford, twill and satin. Broadcloth, poplin and end-on-end are variations of the plain weave. After weaving, finishing can be applied to the fabric.

Shirts and politics

In the 1920s and 1930s, fascists wore different coloured shirts:

Black shirts were used by the Italian fascio, and in Britain, Finland and Germany and Croatia.
Brownshirts were worn by German Nazis of the SA.
The Blueshirts was a fascist movement in Ireland and Canada, and the colour of the Portuguese Nacional Sindicalistas, the Spanish Falange Española, the French Solidarité Française, and the Chinese Blue Shirts Society.
Green shirts were used in Hungary, Ireland, Romania, Brazil and Portugal.
Camisas Doradas (golden shirts) were used in Mexico.
Silver Shirts were worn in the United States of America.

In addition, red shirts have been used to symbolize a variety of different political groups, including Garibaldi's Italian revolutionaries, nineteenth century American street gangs, and socialist militias in Spain and Mexico during the 1930s.

In the UK, the Social Credit movement of the thirties wore green shirts.